SCHIZOPHRENIC CONSTELLATIONS
The discoveries of Dr. med. Ryke Geerd Hamer - presented by Caroline Markolin, Ph.D.
Introduction Theories Schizophrenic Constellations Brainstem Constellation Kidney Collecting Tubules Constellation Cerebellum Constellation Cerebral Medulla Constellation Bite Constellation Motor Cortex Constellation (Post)Sensory Cortex Constellation Scent Constellation The Temporal Lobes Postmortal Constellation Casanova Constellation Nympho Constellation Aggressive Constellation Flying Constellation Hearing Constellation Mytho Constellation Autistic Constellation Marking Constellation Bulimia Constellation Anorexia Constellation Paranoia Constellation Frontal Constellation Frontal-Occpital Constellation Additional Cortical Conflicts INDEX A-Z








PARANOIA CONSTELLATION
PARANOIA CONSTELLATION


Brain and Organ Level: The conflicts correspond to the retina and the vitreous body that are controlled from the visual cortex. The visual cortex is located at the back of the head; hence, the relation to “persecution conflicts”.

The left half of the retina and the left half of the vitreous body of both eyes are controlled from the left side of the visual cortex. The right half of the retina and the right half of the vitreous body of both eyes are controlled from the right side of the visual cortex.

NOTE: A person’s biological handedness and whether the conflicts are mother/child or partner-related determine on which brain hemisphere the conflicts register. Since there is no cross-over correlation from the brain to the organ, the principle of laterality is reversed.

The constellation is established, the moment the second conflict registers in the opposite brain hemisphere. The conflicts could also occur simultaneously. The constellation can be permanent or recurring due to tracks or conflict relapses.
The Visual Cortex Constellation presents as paranoia. The purpose of the paranoid thoughts or behaviors is to be hyper-vigilant in order to be prepared for a conflict of the same kind. The extent of the paranoia s proportional to the intensity of the conflicts.

“There’s always an element of truth hidden somewhere in a paranoid plot.”

Roberta Payne, Speaking to My Madness: How I Searched for Myself in Schizophrenia

Depending on the original conflict situation, a person in this constellation might develop a persistent suspiciousness that others have hostile motives towards one, that the partner is cheating, that a family member is after one’s money, of getting ripped off, and the like. So-called persecutory delusions (“they are out to get me”, “they are after me”) develop when the “fears of predators” (tax inspectors, bailiffs, government authorities, the police) are very strong. In psychiatry, the “delusions” are diagnosed as “paranoid schizophrenia”.

Compulsive paranoid behaviors include repeated checking whether the door is securely locked or the electrical appliances are switched off, compulsive checking of wallets and purses, excessive checking for mistakes when writing a cheque, filling out a form, or for spelling errors as well as obsessive cleaning or compulsive hand washing due to a preoccupation with germs, dirt, or sweat (sweat could be a track for compulsive showering or excessive laundry washing).

The left brain scan shows a Paranoia Constellation (view the GNM diagram) involving the control centers of the vitreous body of both eyes. The corresponding biological conflicts are “fears of a predator”.

The brain scan on the right shows a Paranoia Constellation involving both retina relays. The corresponding biological conflicts are “fears that cannot be shaken off”.

Neuroimaging studies suggest that paranoid behaviors such as compulsive checking are linked to a patient’s “hypermetabolism in the brain regions related to paying attention and reflexive bodily movements” (Archives of General Psychiatry, 2004). These “findings” fit the current psychiatric theory of an “abnormal brain chemistry” as the alleged cause of mental diseases. On close inspection, the study makes no sense at all.